25 August 1554 – Death of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk

Posted By on August 25, 2016

Thomas Howard, Duke of NorfolkOn this day in history, 25th August 1554, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, magnate, soldier and uncle of Queens Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, died of natural causes at his home of Kenninghall in Norfolk. He was laid to rest in St Michael’s Church, Framlingham, Suffolk.

Thomas Howard was the eldest son of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, and of Elizabeth Tilney. Howard’s father and grandfather had fought on Richard III’s side at the Battle of Bosworth but Howard was able to work his way back into royal favour by fighting for the Crown against both the Cornish rebels and the Scots in 1497. He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1510, was created Earl of Surrey in 1514 and succeeded his father as Duke of Norfolk in 1524. In September 1514 he was prominent in leading the English army in defeating the Scots at the Battle of Flodden.

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Margaret Pole, Countess at Home by Susan Higginbotham

Posted By on August 24, 2016

Warblington_castle_tower_from_churchyard WikicommonsA warm welcome to Susan Higginbotham who is joining us today as part of the book tour for ler latest book, a biography: Margaret Pole: The Countess in the Tower. Here is an extract from her book and you’ll find details of her book at the bottom of this post.

Naturally, Margaret did not confine herself to one residence or spend time at all of her estates; rather, she spent most of her time at Clavering in Essex, Bisham at Berkshire, Le Herber in London, and Warblington in Hampshire. . .

Nothing remains of Warblington Castle but a gatehouse turret, built in brick and stone. It is particularly irksome that the castle, dismantled during the Civil War, lies in ruins, for unlike Margaret’s other primary residences, it was built to her specifications–indeed, as John Goodall wrote in The English Castle, it was the ‘only castle of the English Middle Ages unambiguously created in its entirety by a female patron’. The written record, however, offers us a glimpse of the castle as it appeared in its glory days. In 1632, its current owner had it surveyed by William Luffe, who reported:

The site of the principal Manor House of Warblington is a very fair place, well moated about, built all with bricks and stones, and is of great receipt, built square, in length 200 feet and in breadth 200 feet, with a fair green court within, and buildings round the said court, with a fair gallery and divers chambers of great count, and four towers covered with lead, with a very great and spacious hall, parlour, and great chamber, and all other houses of office whatsoever, necessary for such a house, with a very fair chapel within the said house, and the place covered all with tiles and stones ; and there is a fair green court before the gate of the said house, containing two acres of land, and there is a very spacious garden with pleasant walks adjoining, containing two acres of land, and near to the said place, groves of trees containing two acres of land, two orchards and two little meadow plots containing eight acres, and a fair fishpond near the said place, with a gate for wood and two barns, one of five bays the other of four bays, with stables and other outhouses.

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24 August 1572 – St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in Paris

24 August 1572 – St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in Paris

On this day in history, 24th August 1572, the feast day of St Bartholomew, an awful event took place in Paris, France. An estimated 3,000 French Protestants (Huguenots) were massacred in the city, and a further estimated 7,000 in the provinces. According to tradition, Catherine de’ Medici persuaded her son, King Charles IX of France, […]

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22 August 1485 – The Battle of Bosworth

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August 1535 – Sir Nicholas Poyntz plays host to Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn

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16 August 1513 – The Battle of the Spurs

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